Three Accidents

We never like to get bad news, but from a family history perspective, bad news often means we do get to read about our ancestors.  With that in mind, we offer the following article from the September 13, 1901 Skidmore Standard, page 1:

Three Accidents

Last Thursday evening, Sept. 5, as Edgar Nowling was on his way home from Oregon where he had been engaged in cutting corn, he met with an accident that caused the death of one of his horses, a badly demolished corn binder and a narrow escape from death for the driver.

He drove onto a bridge about one and a half miles this side of New Point and one of the horses crowded another off of the bridge into the creek dragging the other two horses and the corn binder after it.  Mr. Nowling jumped from the machine far enough away that he received no injuries other than the jolt he received when he landed at the bottom of the creek seven feet below.  One of the horses received such injuries as to cause its death the next day.

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Saturday afternoon during the band concert, Clifford Mitchell, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Mitchell, was standing in the street listening to the music when a team came along and Master Clifford began backing away to let the team pass.  So intent was he to see all that was going on he failed to notice a horse and buggy approaching from the rear.  It seemed the driver did not notice the boy who was now directly under the horse’s feet.  The horse stepped on the boy’s arm and leg and skinned him up quite severely but no bones were broken.

Another little fellow backed up between the double tree and front wheel of James Sweet’s wagon, but fortunately Mr. Sweet saw the lad and stopped his team in time to save the boy from being run over.

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Another accident which happened at about 6:30 o’clock came very near costing the life of little Miss Hester Caldwell. She was bringing Jas. Cook’s cow from the pasture south of town, and had the rope, which she was leading the cow with, tied around her waist.  The cow became frightened at something and started running north towards the depot, dragging the little girl after her.  At the south railroad crossing the cow turned west and run as far as James Cook’s residence where she was stopped by him.  The little girl’s clothing was torn to shreds but, outside of a few scratches and bruises was not seriously hurt.  Dr. A. T. Campbell was called and dressed the wounds.

This should be a warning to all the little lads and lassies to never tie a rope to them when a cow is tied to the other end.

 

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